NEH Reading and Conversation Series: Victoria Chang and Afaa Weaver

April 28, 2021 @ 4:00 pm

Continuing our poetry lecture and conversation series are Victoria Chang and Afaa Weaver, with conversation moderated by Kate Gale, on bending the rules of Formalism.

With the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Red Hen Press is proud to bring a unique lecture and conversation series to the public, focusing on the history and future of formalism in poetry.

The unifying thread of this conversation series is exploring formalist poetry and the role it plays in our culture as poetry continues to evolve. Why do we as readers and listeners to poetry continue to love the sound and rhythm of formal poetry? Why does it create a kind of heartbeat for us?

Our series is organized with a movement from the traditional to the contemporary, bringing in diverse experiences and voices. Speakers will discuss poetry’s formal foundation and how teaching these building blocks allows for growth. In order for young people to do experimental poetry, they have to know what rules to break; to play with form, they have to know what form is. In poetry, traditional forms are the way we learn technique. If poetry were dance, form is ballet.

Streamed live on redhen.org, facebook.com/redhenpress, and youtube.com/redhenpressbeats

Details

Date:
April 28
Time:
4:00 pm
Cost:
Free
Event Category:
Event Tags:
Website:
https://fb.me/e/arXCi91W3

Rising Up: Poets Take A Stand

April 17, 2021 @ 4:00 pm 5:00 pm

A BookSwell literary reading and fundraiser for Stop AAPI Hate

Join us to hear four poets from different backgrounds who are concerned with issues of social justice. Lisbeth Coiman, Deborah J. Hunter, Teresa Mei Chuc, and Leonora Simonovis will share their poems of resistance to stand up to racism, dictators, and the machinery of war itself.

This online event, produced by Lisbeth Coiman in collaboration with Bookswell, is free to attend via Zoom and YouTube. All proceeds from pay-what-you-will ticketed donations will go to Stop AAPI Hate.

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NEH Reading and Conversation Series: Brynn Saito and David Mason

April 7, 2021 @ 4:00 pm

Continuing our poetry lecture and conversation series are Brynn Saito and David Mason, with conversation moderated by Jason Schneiderman, on narrative forms and the ballad in poetry.

With the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Red Hen Press is proud to bring a unique lecture and conversation series to the public, focusing on the history and future of formalism in poetry.

The unifying thread of this conversation series is exploring formalist poetry and the role it plays in our culture as poetry continues to evolve. Why do we as readers and listeners to poetry continue to love the sound and rhythm of formal poetry? Why does it create a kind of heartbeat for us?

Our series is organized with a movement from the traditional to the contemporary, bringing in diverse experiences and voices. Speakers will discuss poetry’s formal foundation and how teaching these building blocks allows for growth. In order for young people to do experimental poetry, they have to know what rules to break; to play with form, they have to know what form is. In poetry, traditional forms are the way we learn technique. If poetry were dance, form is ballet.

Streamed live on redhen.org, facebook.com/redhenpress, and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZCe601kxiY

Details

Date:
April 7
Time:
4:00 pm
Cost:
Free
Event Category:
Event Tags:
Website:
https://fb.me/e/3LoYjhdmm

Lift Every Voice: When Poems Call and Poems Respond with Douglas Kearney

Poets often compose poems that respond to other poems. Sometimes, these new poems make glancing allusions to their sources. Sometimes they may be ironic parodies, frustrated retorts, or extensions of the source’s concerns and themes. In this reading/talk, poet Douglas Kearney will share writing from the Lift Every Voice anthology that has inspired poetic response over time and distance.
This program is part of Lift Every Voice: Why African American Poetry Matters, a national public humanities initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and Emerson Collective.

About Douglas Kearney:

Douglas Kearney has published six collections, including Buck Studies (Fence Books, 2016), winner of the Theodore Roethke Memorial Poetry Award, the CLMP Firecracker Award for Poetry, and California Book Award silver medalist (Poetry). M. NourbeSe Philip calls Kearney’s collection of libretti, Someone Took They Tongues. (Subito, 2016), “a seismic, polyphonic mash-up.” Kearney’s Mess and Mess and (Noemi Press, 2015), was a Small Press Distribution Handpicked Selection that Publisher’s Weekly called “an extraordinary book.” His newest collection, Sho (Wave, 2021) is forthcoming. His operas include Sucktion, Mordake, Crescent City, Sweet Land, and next 2021’s Comet / Poppea commissioned by AMOC (American Modern Opera Company). He has received a Whiting Writer’s Award, a Foundation for Contemporary Arts Cy Twombly Award for Poetry, residencies/fellowships from Cave Canem, The Rauschenberg Foundation, and others. Raised in Altadena, CA, Kearney teaches Creative Writing at the University of Minnesota–Twin Cities and lives in St. Paul with his family.

Lift Every Voice: Poetry and Survival in African American Los Angeles

Join the Studio City Branch of the Los Angeles Public Library as we host poet James Jones, who will explore how poetry has helped knit together the African American community of Los Angeles during the most difficult times. Jones and collaborators will read and discuss poetry from the Watts Riots to the present, and then the audience will have the chance to write and share their own poetry about the present moment.
This program is part of Lift Every Voice: Why African American Poetry Matters, a national public humanities initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and Emerson Collective.