All events listed below take place online. Please visit the organizers’ websites for details.

Notice: Utilizing the form controls will dynamically update the content

Julian E. Zelizer, in conversation with David Cross, discusses Burning Down the House

When Donald Trump was elected president in 2016, President Obama observed that Trump "is not an outlier; he is a culmination, a logical conclusion of the rhetoric and tactics of the Republican Party." In Burning Down the House, historian Julian Zelizer pinpoints the moment when our country was set on a path toward an era of bitterly partisan and ruthless politics, an era that was ignited by Newt Gingrich and his allies. In 1989, Gingrich brought down Democratic Speaker of the House Jim Wright and catapulted himself into the national spotlight. Perhaps more than any other politician, Gingrich introduced the rhetoric and tactics that have shaped Congress and the Republican Party for the last three decades.

Free

Christina Hammonds Reed discusses “The Black Kids” with Brandy Colbert

Ashley Bennett and her friends are living the charmed life. It’s the end of senior year and they’re spending more time at the beach than in the classroom. They can already feel the sunny days and endless possibilities of summer. Everything changes one afternoon in April, when four LAPD officers are acquitted after beating a black man named Rodney King half to death. Suddenly, Ashley’s not just one of the girls. She’s one of the black kids.

Free

Ian Svenonius, in conversation with Henry Rollins, discusses The Psychic Soviet

A reissue of Ian F. Svenonius's cult-classic debut essay collection, including brand-new writing in this expanded edition. Ian F. Svenonius is the author of the underground best sellers Supernatural Strategies for Making a Rock 'n' Roll Group and Censorship Now!! He was also the host of VBS.tv's Soft Focus, where he interviewed Mark E. Smith, Genesis P. Orridge, Chan Marshall, Ian MacKaye, and others.

Free

Bradley Garrett discusses “Bunker” with Geoff Manaugh

Currently, 3.7 million Americans call themselves preppers. Millions more prep without knowing it. Bradley Garrett, who began writing this book years before the 2020 Covid-19 pandemic, argues that prepping is a rational response to global, social, and political systems that are failing to produce credible narratives of continued stability. Left with a sense of foreboding fueled by disease outbreaks, increasing government dysfunctionality, eroding critical infrastructure, nuclear brinksmanship, and an accelerating climate crisis, people all over the world are responding predictably—by hunkering down.

Free

Elevenses with the Reps August 12th

Join us on Wednesday, August 12th at 11:00 am for a virtual event with our publisher sales reps. Grab your tea, late breakfast, or early lunch and tune in to hear our reps talk about their current book recommendations.

Free

Akwaeke Emezi discusses “The Death of Vivek Oji”

One afternoon, in a town in southeastern Nigeria, a mother opens her front door to discover her son's body, wrapped in colorful fabric, at her feet. What follows is the tumultuous, heart-wrenching story of one family's struggle to understand a child whose spirit is both gentle and mysterious. Raised by a distant father and an understanding but overprotective mother, Vivek suffers disorienting blackouts, moments of disconnection between self and surroundings.

Free

Catherine Lacey discusses “Pew” with Jonathan Lethem

As the town spends the week preparing for a mysterious Forgiveness Festival, Pew is shuttled from one household to the next. The earnest and seemingly well-meaning townspeople see conflicting identities in Pew, and many confess their fears and secrets to them in one-sided conversations. Pew listens and observes while experiencing brief flashes of past lives or clues about their origin. As days pass, the void around Pew’s presence begins to unnerve the community, whose generosity erodes into menace and suspicion. Yet by the time Pew’s story reaches a shattering and unsettling climax at the Forgiveness Festival, the secret of who they really are—a devil or an angel or something else entirely—is dwarfed by even larger truths.

Free

I Read Your Book And…with Harry Gamboa, Jr.

Join acclaimed artist, writer, and educator Harry Gamboa, Jr. and journalist Rex Weiner for an in-depth discussion of Gamboa's new poetry collection Flowers for the Dead. Harry Gamboa Jr. is an artist, writer, and educator. He is the founder and director of the international performance troupe, Virtual Vérité (2005-2017). He is also a co-founder of Asco (1972-1985), the Los Angeles-based performance group.

Free

Shruti Swamy, in conversation with Rachel Khong, discusses “A House Is a Body: Stories”

Dreams collide with reality, modernity with antiquity, and myth with identity in the twelve arresting stories of A House Is a Body. In "Earthly Pleasures," a young painter living alone in San Francisco begins a secret romance with one of India's biggest celebrities, and desire and ego are laid bare. In "A Simple Composition," a husband's professional crisis leads to his wife's discovery of a dark, ecstatic joy.

Free

Patrick Howell, Tori Reid, Tom Lutz, and Mobolaji Olambiwonnu discuss “Dispatches from the Vanguard”

Described by Run-DMC founder Rev.Run as “exceptional”, Dispatches from the Vanguard is a celebration of the Global International African Arts Movement. Featuring interviews by editor Patrick A. Howell with writers, poets, artists, social entrepreneurs, and activists, the book provides incredible insight into the work of leading cultural innovators. Among those interviewed are Ishmael Reed, Tyehimba Jess, Rich Fresh, Nikki Giovanni, Nnedi Okorafor, Chester Higgins, and Jaki Shelton Green.

Free

Deborah Lott discusses “Don’t Go Crazy Without Me”

You are invited to virtually join author Deborah Lott in conversation with author Melissa Cistaro. They will be discussing Lott's recently released memoir and and also refer to Cistaro's 2015 memoir - both books examine fraught family relationships.

Free

Mike Davis and Jon Wiener discuss “Set the Night on Fire” in conversation with Erin Aubry Kaplan and Danny Widener

Los Angeles in the sixties was a hotbed of political and social upheaval. The city was a launchpad for Black Power--where Malcolm X and Angela Davis first came to prominence and the Watts uprising shook the nation. The city was home to the Chicano Blowouts and Chicano Moratorium, as well as being the birthplace of "Asian American" as a political identity. It was a locus of the antiwar movement, gay liberation movement, and women's movement, and, of course, the capital of California counterculture.Mike Davis and Jon Wiener provide the first comprehensive movement history of L.A. in the sixties, drawing on extensive archival research and dozens of interviews with principal figures, as well as the authors' storied personal histories as activists.

Free

Ariel Sabar discusses “Veritas”

In 2012, Dr. Karen King, a star professor at Harvard Divinity School, announced a blockbuster discovery at a scholarly conference just steps from the Vatican: She had found an ancient fragment of papyrus in which Jesus calls Mary Magdalene "my wife."

Free

Lauren Sandler, in conversation with John Williams, discusses “This Is All I Got: A New Mother’s Search for Home”

Camila is twenty-two years old and a new mother. She has no family to rely on, no partner, and no home. Despite her intelligence and determination, the odds are firmly stacked against her. In this extraordinary work of literary reportage, Lauren Sandler chronicles a year in Camila's life--from the birth of her son to his first birthday--as she navigates the labyrinth of poverty and homelessness in New York City. In her attempts to secure a safe place to raise her son and find a measure of freedom in her life, Camila copes with dashed dreams, failed relationships, the desolation of abandonment, and miles of red tape with grit, humor, and uncanny resilience.

Free

Sara Schaefer discusses “Grand: A Memoir”

When Sara Schaefer is in first grade, her father warns her to always tell the truth because one lie leads to another and soon you will find yourself in a hole you can't escape. A few years later, the Schaefer family is completely upended when it's revealed that their grand life is based on a lie. Her parents become pariahs in their upper middle class community and go from non-religious people to devout church members. The idea of good and evil as binary, opposed forces is drilled into Sara and it becomes the perfect framework on which to build her anxiety and increasingly-obsessive thoughts.

Free

Terrell Carter, in conversation with Ta’Ronda Jones, discusses “Problem Child”

"Problem Child" is the unbelievably true story of Terrell Carter, an American musician and actor who grew up in Buffalo, New York, in a dysfunctional family, each member crazier than the next. And the Problem Child is the only one in the story who may, or may not, actually have a problem. An emotional journey of trials and revelations, with a huge secret at its core, this story may force you to laugh—just to keep from crying.

Free

Claire Phillips discusses “A Room with a Darker View” with Emily Rapp Black

A daughter breaks the family silence about her mother’s schizophrenia, reframing hospitalizations, paranoia, illness, and caregiving through a feminist lens. Claire Phillips’ elegantly written and unflinching memoir about her mother, an Oxford-trained lawyer diagnosed in mid-life with paranoid schizophrenia, challenges current conceptions about mental illness, relapse and recovery, as well as difficulties caring for an aging parent with a chronic disease.

Free

Alex Richards & Liz Lawson in conversation about their latest releases “Accidental and The Lucky Ones”

ACCIDENTAL: Johanna has had more than enough trauma in her life. She lost her mom in a car accident, and her father went AWOL when Johanna was just a baby. At sixteen, life is steady, boring . . . maybe even stifling, since she's being raised by her grandparents who never talk about their daughter, her mother Mandy. THE LUCKY ONES: May is a survivor. But she doesn't feel like one. She feels angry. And lost. And alone. Eleven months after the school shooting that killed her twin brother, May still doesn't know why she was the only one to walk out of the band room that day. No one gets what she went through--no one saw and heard what she did. No one can possibly understand how it feels to be her.

Free

E=Mc2Bodied Poetry Workshop Reading

Other - see description

E=Mc2Bodied Poetry Workshop Series, August Plums features CASSANDRA LANE RICH & TYRIS WINTERS with Maria Berry, Ruth Christopher, Karen Cordova, Jessica DePue, Mia Goldman, Elizabeth Guevara, Arthur Kayzakian, Katherine Lansing and Cyrus Sephabodi. Please RSVP to host Peggy Dobreer, adhocink@yahoo.com to secure your seat in our Zoom Room. Details for joining will be sent with the program via email the day before so be sure to RSVP at adhocink@yahoo.com so that we have your email address. (You will not be able to enter from this event page.) CASSANDRA LANE is author of We Are Bridges (Feminist Press, 2021), winner of the Louise Meriwether Book Prize and Managing Editor of L.A. Parent. Her stories have appeared in the Everything But the Burden, Ms. Aligned, the Atlanta Journal Constitution, Writers Resist, Expressing Motherhood, Fury: Women’s Lived Experiences During the Trump Era,The NYT’s “Conception” series and more. She received an M.F.A. from Antioch University LA. A Louisiana native, she calls Los Angeles, where she lives with her family, her second home. TYRIS WINTER is an aspiring legend and self proclaimed 70s guru. With a passion for the arts, his love lies in multiple outlets, from painting, dancing, fashion, to poetry. Winter has a Read More ...

Vanessa R. Schwartz discusses “Jet Age Aesthetic” with Britt Salvesen

A stunning look at the profound impact of the jet plane on the mid-century aesthetic, from Disneyland to Life magazine Vanessa R. Schwartz engagingly presents the jet plane’s power to define a new age at a critical moment in the mid-20th century, arguing that the craft’s speed and smooth ride allowed people to imagine themselves living in the future. Exploring realms as diverse as airport architecture, theme park design, film, and photography, Schwartz argues that the jet created an aesthetic that circulated on the ground below.

Free

Jon Wiener discusses “Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the 60s”

Los Angeles in the sixties was a hotbed of political and social upheaval. The city was a launchpad for Black Power--where Malcolm X and Angela Davis first came to prominence and the Watts uprising shook the nation. The city was home to the Chicano Blowouts and Chicano Moratorium, as well as being the birthplace of "Asian American" as a political identity. It was a locus of the antiwar movement, gay liberation movement, and women's movement, and, of course, the capital of California counterculture.

Free

DJ Waldie discusses “Becoming Los Angeles”

Becoming Los Angeles, a new collection by the author of the acclaimed memoir Holy Land, blends history, memory, and critical analysis to illuminate how Angelenos have seen themselves and their city. Waldie's particular concern is commonplace Los Angeles, whose rhythms of daily life are set against the gaudy backdrop of historical myth and Hollywood illusion. It's through sacred ordinariness that Waldie experiences the city's seasons. In his exploration of sprawling Los Angeles, he considers how the city's image was constructed and how it fostered willful amnesia about the city's conflicted past.

Free

Makenna Goodman discusses “The Shame” with Kathryn Scanlan

What if you could change your life? Would you do it? How would you do it? Alma and her family live close to the land: they raise chickens and sheep, they make maple syrup. Every day Alma’s husband leaves for his job at a nearby college while she stays home with their young children, cleans, searches for secondhand goods online, and reads books by the women writers she adores. Then, one night, she abruptly leaves it all behind—speeding through the darkness, away from their Vermont homestead, bound for New York.

Free

Gail Tsukiyama discusses “The Color of Air”

Daniel Abe, a young doctor in Chicago, is finally coming back to Hawai'i. He has his own reason for returning to his childhood home, but it is not to revisit the past, unlike his Uncle Koji. Koji lives with the memories of Daniel's mother, Mariko, the love of his life, and the scars of a life hard-lived. He can't wait to see Daniel, who he's always thought of as a son, but he knows the time has come to tell him the truth about his mother, and his father. But Daniel's arrival coincides with the awakening of the Mauna Loa volcano, and its dangerous path toward their village stirs both new and long ago passions in their community.

Free

Myla Goldberg discusses “Feast Your Eyes”

east Your Eyes, framed as the catalogue notes from a photography show at the Museum of Modern Art, tells the life story of Lillian Preston: "America's Worst Mother, America's Bravest Mother, America's Worst Photographer, or America's Greatest Photographer, depending on who was talking." After discovering photography as a teenager through her high school's photo club, Lillian rejects her parents' expectations of college and marriage and moves to New York City in 1955. When a small gallery exhibits partially nude photographs of Lillian and her daughter Samantha, Lillian is arrested, thrust into the national spotlight, and targeted with an obscenity charge. Mother and daughter's sudden notoriety changes the course of both of their lives, and especially Lillian's career as she continues a life-long quest for artistic legitimacy and recognition.

Free

Jonathan L. Friedmann discusses “Jewish Los Angeles”

The first known Jewish resident of the Mexican Pueblo de Los Ángeles arrived in 1841. When California entered the Union in 1850, the census listed just eight Jews living in Los Angeles. By 1855, the fledgling city had a Hebrew Benevolent Society and a Jewish cemetery. The first Jewish congregation and kosher market were established in 1862. Meanwhile, Jewish merchants and business owners founded banks, fraternal orders, charities, athletic clubs, and social service organizations. Jewish property owners developed vast areas of Los Angeles and beyond into the neighborhoods and cities we know today. By 1897, the city’s Jewish population was large enough to support its own newspaper. The 20th century brought waves of Jewish immigrants and migrants to Los Angeles, where they built the motion picture and television industries, Cedars-Sinai and City of Hope medical centers, the Jewish Home for the Aging, urban and suburban synagogues and Jewish centers, and other institutions. The foundations laid by these enterprising pioneers helped transform Los Angeles into a major metropolis.

Free

This website's content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. You are free to share and adapt with attribution.