All events listed below take place online. Please visit the organizers’ websites for details.

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Susan Wiggs, in conversation with Garth Stein & Erica Bauermeister, discusses “The Lost & Found Bookshop”

Somewhere in the vast Library of the Universe, as Natalie thought of it, there was a book that embodied exactly the things she was worrying about. In the wake of a shocking tragedy, Natalie Harper inherits her mother's charming but financially strapped bookshop in San Francisco. She also becomes caretaker for her ailing grandfather Andrew, her only living relative--not counting her scoundrel father.

Free

Tracy Anne Hart, in conversation with Nalle Colt, discusses “Seeing Stevie Ray”

It may be difficult to say anything about Stevie Ray Vaughan that hasn't already been said. The skinny kid from Oak Cliff on the south side of Dallas who followed his older brother Jimmie in and out of local blues clubs and eventually to Austin would go on to establish himself as the finest guitar player of his generation and perhaps the best of all time. Vaughan was truly a conduit for the symphony of the universe. The music that flowed through him endeared him to hordes of fans and won him near-divine status among guitarists. Vaughan continues to inspire and enthrall even decades after his passing.

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Wayne Koestenbaum reads from “Figure it Out” with Maggie Nelson

In his new nonfiction collection, poet, artist, critic, novelist, and performer Wayne Koestenbaum enacts twenty-six ecstatic collisions between his mind and the world. A subway passenger’s leather bracelet prompts musings on the German word for “stranger”; Montaigne leads to the memory of a fourth-grade friend’s stinky feet. Wayne dreams about a handjob from John Ashbery, swims next to Nicole Kidman, reclaims Robert Rauschenberg’s squeegee, and apotheosizes Marguerite Duras as a destroyer of sentences.

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The Queer Book Club reads “The Last 8” by Laura Pohl

Book clubs are still a thing around here, and just in time for the pandemic lockdown. You’re stuck at home, but you’re not alone. Get your ticket here, email us your address, we’ll mail you your book, and then we’ll Zoom together and talk about it. All our fantastic moderators are still on board. (Specific instructions follow after you’ve got your ticket.) Laura Pohl’s The Last 8, is a post-apocalyptic tale, pitting the last 8 teenagers against an alien invasion.

Purchase Required

Heather Cocks & Jessica Morgan discuss “The Heir Affair”

After a scandalous secret turns their fairy-tale wedding into a nightmare, Rebecca "Bex" Porter and her husband Prince Nicholas are in self-imposed exile. The public is angry. The Queen is even angrier. And the press is salivating. Cutting themselves off from friends and family, and escaping the world's judgmental eyes, feels like the best way to protect their fragile, all-consuming romance.

Free

Brandy Colbert reads from “The Voting Booth” with Nina Lacour

Marva Sheridan was born ready for this day. She's always been driven to make a difference in the world, and what better way than to vote in her first election? Duke Crenshaw is so done with this election. He just wants to get voting over with so he can prepare for his band's first paying gig tonight. Only problem? Duke can't vote.

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Thabile Makue, in conversation with Valyelwa Maluleke, discusses “‘mamaseko”

Named after the poet's mother, 'mamaseko is a collection of introspective lyrics and other poems dealing with the intersections of blood relationships and related identities. Thabile Makue questions what it means to be beings of blood--to relate by blood, to live by blood. In her poems Makue looks for traces of shared trauma and pain and asserts that wounds of the blood are healed by the same. (University of Nebraska Press)

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Gail Tsukiyama discusses “The Color of Air”

Daniel Abe, a young doctor in Chicago, is finally coming back to Hawai'i. He has his own reason for returning to his childhood home, but it is not to revisit the past, unlike his Uncle Koji. Koji lives with the memories of Daniel's mother, Mariko, the love of his life, and the scars of a life hard-lived. He can't wait to see Daniel, who he's always thought of as a son, but he knows the time has come to tell him the truth about his mother, and his father. But Daniel's arrival coincides with the awakening of the Mauna Loa volcano, and its dangerous path toward their village stirs both new and long ago passions in their community.

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Katherine Alford and kathy Gunst discusses “Rage Baking”

Since the 2016 election, many women across the country have felt rage, fury, and frustration, wondering how we got here. Some act by calling their senators, some write checks, some join activist groups, march, paint signs, grab their daughters and sons, and raise their voices. But for so many, they also turn to their greatest comfort--their kitchen. ​

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Richard Farrell, in conversation with Robin Oliveira, discusses “The Falling Woman”

First, it's just a barely believable rumor: one person may have survived the midair explosion of a passenger jet on a cross-country course from Washington, D.C., to San Francisco. But soon she becomes a national media sensation when "the Falling Woman," as the press dubs her, is said to have been taken to a Wichita hospital--and then to have disappeared without a trace.

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Sameer Pandya, in conversation with Jade Chang, discusses “Members Only”

Raj Bhatt is often unsure of where he belongs. Having moved to America from Bombay as a child, he knew few Indian kids. Now middle-aged, he lives mostly happily in California, with a job at a university. Still, his white wife seems to fit in better than he does at times, especially at their tennis club, a place he's cautiously come to love

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Robin Wasserman launches her novel “Mother Daughter Widow Wife” with Leslie Jamison

Who is Wendy Doe? The woman, found on a Peter Pan Bus to Philadelphia, has no money, no ID, and no memory of who she is, where she was going, or what she might have done. She’s assigned a name and diagnosis by the state: Dissociative fugue, a temporary amnesia that could lift at any moment—or never at all. When Dr. Benjamin Strauss invites her to submit herself for experimental observation at his Meadowlark Institute for Memory Research, she feels like she has no other choice.

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Gabriel Bump, in conversation with Jaquira Diaz discusses “Everywhere You Don’t Belong”

In this alternately witty and heartbreaking debut novel, Gabriel Bump gives us an unforgettable protagonist, Claude McKay Love. Claude isn't dangerous or brilliant--he's an average kid coping with abandonment, violence, riots, failed love, and societal pressures as he steers his way past the signposts of youth: childhood friendships, basketball tryouts, first love, first heartbreak, picking a college, moving away from home.

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Dr. Aaron Berkowitz discusses One by One by One

Dr. Berkowitz had just finished his neurology training when he was sent to Haiti on his first assignment with Partners In Health. There, he meets Janel, a 23-year-old man with the largest brain tumor Berkowitz or any of his neurosurgeon colleagues at Harvard Medical School have ever seen. Determined to live up to Partners In Health's mission statement "to bring the benefits of modern medical science to those most in need," Berkowitz tries to save Janel's life by bringing him back to Boston for a 12-hour surgery.

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Congressman Eric Swalwell, in conversation with Representative Ted Lieu, discusses “Endgame: Inside the Impeachment of Donald J. Trump”

In Endgame, Congressman Eric Swalwell offers his personal account of his path to office and how he and his colleagues resisted, investigated, and impeached a corrupt president. After the shock of the 2016 election and Trump's inauguration (including the luncheon afterward), Swalwell, as a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and the House Judiciary Committee, quickly became involved in pushing back against Trump's outrageous actions as he sought to get to the bottom of foreign interference in our elections.

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Deborah Lott, in conversation with Barbara Abercrombie, discusses “Don’t Go Crazy Without Me”

Don't Go Crazy Without Me tells the tragicomic coming of age story of a girl who grew up under the seductive sway of her outrageously eccentric father. He taught her how to have fun; he also taught her to fear food poisoning, other children's infectious diseases, and the contaminating propensities of the world at large. Alienated from her emotionally distant mother, the girl bonded closely with her father and his worldview. When he plunged from neurotic to full-blown psychotic, she nearly followed him.

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John Washington and Joe Meno discuss their new books

Between Everything and Nothing: The Journey of Seidu Mohammed and Razak Ayal and the Quest for Asylum (Counterpoint) Long before their chance meeting at a Minneapolis bus station, Ghanaian asylum seekers Seidu Mohammed and Razak Iyal had already crossed half the world in search of a new home. Seidu, who identifies as bisexual, lived under constant threat of exposure and violence in a country where same-sex acts are illegal. Razak’s life was also threatened after corrupt officials contrived to steal his rightful inheritance. The Dispossessed: A Story of Asylum at the U.S Border and Beyond (Verso) The first comprehensive, in-depth book on the Trump administration’s assault on asylum protections.

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Amanda Brainerd discusses “Age of Consent” with Aline Brosh McKenna

It's 1983. David Bowie reigns supreme, and downtown Manhattan has never been cooler. But Justine and Eve are stuck at Griswold Academy, a Connecticut boarding school. Griswold is a far cry from Justine's bohemian life in New Haven, where her parents run a theater and struggle to pay the bills. Eve, the sophisticated daughter of status-obsessed Park Avenue parents, also feels like an outsider amidst Griswold's preppy jocks and debutantes. Justine longs for Eve's privilege, and Eve for Justine's sexual confidence.

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Susan Priver, in conversation with Lian Dolan, discusses “Dancer Interrupted”

Actress Susan Priver began her love affair with the stage as a young ballerina handpicked to attend George Balanchine's School of American Ballet at age 14. But at 17 she blows her chance to become part of the New York City Ballet when she succumbs to a bout of debilitating depression. She eventually restarts her ballet career, dancing with New York's Eglevsky Ballet and the Hannover State Opera, in Germany. But when she's fired by the Cleveland Ballet at age 24, she finds herself overwhelmed with shame, without the strength or confidence to audition for another company.

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Damien Echols, in conversation with Seane Corn, discusses “Angels and Archangels: A Magician’s Guide”

"Angels do not belong to any one single religion, system, or dogma," teaches Damien Echols. "They are almost pure energy--the very substance the cosmos is made of. They're also incredibly willing to work with us if asked." With Angels and Archangels, this bestselling author presents an essential resource for understanding what angels are, how they make themselves available, and magickal practices to invoke their power to transform your life.

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Kendra Atleework, in conversation with Luis Alberto Urrea, discusses Miracle Country

Kendra Atleework grew up in Swall Meadows, in the Owens Valley of the Eastern Sierra Nevada, where annual rainfall averages five inches and in drought years measures closer to zero. Kendra's parents taught their children to thrive in this beautiful, if harsh, landscape, prone to wildfires, blizzards, and gale-force winds. Above all, they were raised on unconditional love and delight in the natural world. After Kendra's mother died of a rare autoimmune disease when Kendra was just sixteen, however, her once beloved desert world came to feel empty and hostile, as climate change, drought, and wildfires intensified. The Atleework family fell apart, even as her father tried to keep them together.

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Ben Ehrenreich discusses his new book “Desert Notebooks” with Anthony McCann

National Magazine Award winner and The Nation columnist Ben Ehrenreich layers climate science, mythologies, nature writing, and personal experiences into a stunning reckoning with our current moment and with the literal and figurative end of time. Desert Notebooks examines how the unprecedented pace of destruction to our environment and an increasingly unstable geopolitical landscape have led us to the brink of a calamity greater than any humankind has confronted before.

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Chuck Klosterman discusses “Raised in Captivity: Fictional Nonfiction”

A man flying first class discovers a puma in the lavatory. A new coach of a small-town Oklahoma high school football team installs an offense comprised of only one, very special, play. A man explains to the police why he told the employee of his local bodega that his colleague looked like the lead singer of Depeche Mode, a statement that may or may not have led in some way to a violent crime. A college professor discusses with his friend his difficulties with the new generation of students. An obscure power pop band wrestles with its new-found fame when its song "Blizzard of Summer" becomes an anthem for white supremacists. A couple considers getting a medical procedure that will transfer the pain of childbirth from the woman to her husband. A woman interviews a hit man about killing her husband but is shocked by the method he proposes. A man is recruited to join a secret government research team investigating why coin flips are no longer exactly 50/50. A man sees a whale struck by lightning, and knows that everything about his life has to change. A lawyer grapples with the unintended side effects of a veterinarian's rabies vaccination.

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Joe R. Lansdale discusses “More Better Deals”

Ed Edwards is in the used car business, a business built on adjusted odometers, extra-fine print, and the belief that "buyers better beware." Burdened by an aging, alcoholic mother constantly on his case to do something worthier of his lighter skin tone and dreaming of a brighter future for himself and his plucky little sister, Ed is ready to get out of the game.

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Maike Wetzel discusses “Elly”

Eleven-year-old Elly is missing. After an extensive police search she is presumed dead, and her family must learn to live with a gaping hole in their lives. Her parents' marriage is torn apart by grief, while her sister Ines swings between jealousy and guilt.

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Jeff Sweat discusses “Scorpion”

In Scorpion, the sequel to Jeff Sweat's YA futuristic thriller Mayfly, Jemma, Lady, and Pico all left the Holy Wood to seek answers to the End, and when they find the Old Guys--the only adults to have survived the original wipeout of everyone over the age of seventeen--they think they've found help at last.

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Kristen Millares Young reads from “Subduction” with Lory Bedikian, Brittany Ackerman, and Alexandra Teague

Fleeing the shattered remains of her marriage and a betrayal by her sister, in the throes of a midlife freefall, Latina anthropologist Claudia Ranks retreats from Seattle to Neah Bay, a Native American whaling village on the jagged Pacific coast. Claudia yearns to lose herself to the songs of the tribe and the secrets of her guide, a spirited hoarder named Maggie. But when, spurred by his mother’s failing memory, Maggie’s prodigal son Peter returns seeking answers to his father’s murder, Claudia discovers in him the abandon she craves. Through the passionate and violent collision of these two outsiders, Subduction portrays not only their strange allegiance after grievous losses but also their imperfect attempts to find community on the Makah Indian Reservation.

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Nandi Taylor discusses “Given”

Bound by fate. Divided by duty. Yenni has never been this far from home. With only her wits, her strength, and her sacred runelore, the fierce Yirba warrior princess is alone in the Empire of Cresh. It's a land filled with strange magics and even stranger people--all of whom mistrust anyone who's different. But Yenni will prove herself, and find the cure for her father's wasting illness. She will not fail. No one warned her about the dragons. Especially not about him.

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Karen Karbo discusses “Yeah, No. Not Happening”

Why are we so obsessed with being our so-called best selves? Because our modern culture force feeds women lies designed to heighten their insecurities: "You can do it all--crush it at work, at home, in the bedroom, at PTA and at Pilates--and because you can, you should. We can show you how!"

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Cindy Lin discusses “Treasures of Twelve”

Bursting with heart and packed with exciting new places, dangerous obstacles, and mysterious powers, Cindy Lin's sequel to The Twelve is a page-turning race against time that's perfect for fans of The Zodiac Legacy and Spirit Animals series!

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